• Laurie Swigart

THEATRE ETIQUETTE AND EXPERIENCES

Author Unknown


We have a wonderful opportunities to help students learn about attending live performances and what behavior is appropriate. Please discuss the following with your students.


1. An usher will show you where to sit. Walk slowly and talk quietly as you enter the theater.

2. After being led to your seat, use the restroom and/or get a drink before the performance begins.

3. Once you are seated, you may talk quietly to the people next to you until the performance begins.

4. When the lights in the theater begin to dim, it is the signal that the performance is about to begin. You should stop talking and turn your attention to the stage.

5. Stay in your seat throughout the entire performance.

6. During the performance, listen quietly and watch closely. Talking during the performance will disturb others around you. They won't be able to concentrate on the performance, and the performers will think you don't like the show.

7. If you think something is fun, it's OK to laugh. If you like something a lot, applaud. This will let the performer know that you are enjoying the show.

8. At the end of the show, applaud if you had a good time. Applause is how you say thank you to the performer. The performers will bow as you applaud. That is how they say thank you for coming.

9. When the lights get brighter in the theater, the show is over. This means it is time to leave. Watch for an usher who will help your group exit the theater.

10. Please remember also that:

The taking of photographs and the use of recording devices are strictly prohibited.

Remember that you are only one person among several hundred in the audience. Please respect your fellow audience member.

0 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

WHAT THEATRE GRADS NEED TO KNOW

by Kent Lantaff. STAGE DIRECTIONS. October 1996 What do theatrical employers believe actors need to learn from actor training programs? We asked a sampling of those who do the hiring in the theatre --

WHAT ME, JUGGLE?

by Nym M. K. Nevarez. DRAMATICS. May, 1993. Have you ever watched a juggler throwing knives or bowling balls or flaming torches into the air, and wondered, "How does he do that?" Actually, it's a lot

The Creative Personality

Creative individuals are remarkable for their ability to adapt to almost any situation and to make do with whatever is at hand to reach their goals. By Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, published on July 01, 1

Contact the Director

Laurie Swigart ~Director, Designer, & Webmaster ~laurie@dreamcoat.org715-781-5760

Copyright (c) 1997-2020 Theatre on a Shoestring. All rights reserved.

DISCLAIMER: THEATRE ON A SHOESTRING is not responsible for information, images, or links on related sites. All pages that contain links to other sites do so to assist visitors in finding useful and related material. We are not responsible for other sites' content or links.

 

DISCLAIMER: THEATRE ON A SHOESTRING did not willfully use any copyrighted material for the publication of this website. We apologize for any oversight in the acknowledgement of the copyright of the respective object. The copyright for any material created by THEATRE ON A SHOESTRING is reserved.