• Laurie Swigart

APPLYING LATEX PROSTHETICS

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1) Latex prosthetics should be glued to clean, grease-free skin. They may be attached with spirit gum, liquid latex or other products, though latex may detach itself and spirit gum is more common and easier to work with. (I will be using spirit gum techniques in this example)


2) Place the prosthetic exactly where it will be attached and check the fit. If needed, carefully trim the piece, keeping the edges thin and irregular for easier blending.


3) You may wish to powder your skin with the prosthetic in place, creating on outline to help with the later placement when adhesives are used.


4) Remove the prosthetic. Brush spirit gum on the surfaces that are to be attached to your skin.


5) It may be necessary to allow the spirit gum to dry slightly and become tacky if it is particularly thin (watery) to begin with. Then carefully apply the prosthetic to your skin, gently pressing the edges down with your fingers or other tool.


6) If necessary, edges may be further concealed by stippling the edges of the prosthetic and the skin next to it lightly with liquid latex on a sponge. Then apply a makeup made for latex (such as Mehron Mask Cover) to the prosthetic and to your skin. This will insure that both are the same color and blend together better. Most makeups of this type will need to be set with powder.


7) Always follow the instructions that come with any product!

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