• Laurie Swigart

THE MARTHA GAME

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Works best with a group of 8-12. With a larger group, divide into teams.


Groups stands outside a designated performance space.

One person runs into the space, forms her body into a statue, and announces what she is, as in "I'm a tree."


Instantly, the next person runs on and forms something else in the same picture. "I'm a bench under the tree."


The next person further adds to the picture. "I'm a bum on the bench."


"I'm the newspaper the bum is sleeping under."


Etc., until the whole group is part of the picture.


Start again, and again, etc.


Coach this to go very, very fast. There is no time to think -- just go!


Variations could involve having the scenario become a moving picture, then a moving and talking picture.

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